FAB5 Conference Forum

The forum for FAB5 Conference participants!


You are not connected. Please login or register

November: CREAME, DATC, DaeNs, Skill Theory, and deep thinking questions!

Go down  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Admin

avatar
Admin
CREAME, DATC, DaeNs, Skill Theory, and deep thinking questions!


After a bit of a break for October, we are back with great content for November. This month the approach is 'video lecture' instead of reading--we're mixing it up a bit purposefully. (Remember the discussion on novelty?)

Watch my introductory video to this month's content. After viewing that, go on to 
November Pt 1 and then when you feel ready for it, November Pt 2

Looking forward to seeing what you come up with:D
Robert

View user profile http://fab-efl.com
In brief, I would like to describe a couple of the topics in how I see them, and how I feel they relate to my current teaching practices. 

CREAME:  I identify well with 3 of the 4 facets of CREAME, the 4th one I am not sure how completely I practice it.  For Consciousness Raising, I try and prime my students for the content of the classes as much as possible.  This usually starts in the previous lesson, when I am concluding the day.  I try to announce what we will be working on in the following class, or classes.  In addition, for my writing class, when we are starting new, cognitively challenging topics, I like to present them with a single question to think about (without any homework or output necessary) and mull over before the next class.  In class, I always try to start off with one or two relevant warm ups that require the students to discuss the more obvious, concrete facets of a topic before we dive in.
For Emotions Analysis, this usually includes students assessing their own opinions or their classmates opinions on the topic.  And for Manipulation, I always try to give my students some element of choice for their projects/papers.  As for Expansion, I feel like there might be some overlap here (for me) with Emotions Analysis and Manipulation.  To allow my students to get creative with their work, they often have their own choice of material to research, write/present on, and to expand with. Though, I am not sure I understand this one, as I see a great deal of overlap with the EA and M portions of CREAME.

Since starting this Neuro EFL class, I have become most cognizant of Fischer's Skill Theory and how it relates to my students and I.  I include myself in their learning process, because I've realized how limited I have been in my presentation of materials.  Techniques that I used to feel would have been condescending, or unnecessary, are now going a long way with helping prime and scaffold my learners to achieve discussions and papers that require higher abstract thinking skills.  Some concrete examples of how I feel I am better scaffolding my students (with the knowledge of Fischer's skill theory) are:

Introducing material (via presentation, pictures, talking).  For example, consider the question: What are the uses of a British garden?  I will explain what a British garden is used for: outdoor dining, entertaining, sun bathing, sports, letting plants grow naturally, as a social space, etc.

I will ask the students to answer the same question that I have just told them in their groups.  In groups they must answer the question, 'What is a British garden used for?' 

Next, I will ask the class for their answers.  Volunteers will raise their hand and tell me their answers.  Basically, they tell me what I have JUST told them. The content has now been covered 3 times in class.  

Next, I will ask the students to write their answers on their handouts, followed by reading their answers to their peers. 

In this way, we will continue to cover more and more material over the classes.  First the students understand how a British garden is used.  They will later tell me how a Japanese garden is used (after being primed for it), then compare the two.  Once they get to this point, they are not talking/ writing about gardens anymore, they are comparing two cultures, and we start a persuasive paper writing assignment where they demonstrate which is better, a Japanese or British garden.

In the past I would have thought that the redundancy in the discussions was too much, but it seems to actually be what the students need. This is the third year I have run this assignment, and with the help of Fischer's skill theory, my students and I had a much more enjoyable time going through the materials. And the content and depth of thinking in their reasoning and logic is light years ahead of the cohorts from both of the 2 years prior.  It is because I learned, through Fischer's skill theory, that my students are still not fully developed in their prefrontal cortex.  Their ability to understand abstractions, even at only Ab1 or Ab2, is still limited to not only optimal conditions, but also physical conditions.  For this reason, I always try to create optimal conditions, but don't expect my students to 'get it' until they are ready.  Some students catch on to the content in class, for others, they catch on in the next class (after a good rest), and that is ok.  I am not hard on them it... anymore Smile

I am very excited to tackle our next unit, which has been designed with Fischer's skill theory in mind! Smile

View user profile

Admin

avatar
Admin
Hi there! Very Happy


In class, I always try to start off with one or two relevant warm ups that require the students to discuss the more obvious, concrete facets of a topic before we dive in.


Fantastic! Lots of teacher training manuals tell us we need to warm up (as to PE teachers, and music teachers, etc), so while the CR bit may not be groundbreaking, knowing that it makes neuroscientific sense to do so adds motivation to both the teacher (and the student if they are made aware of the CREAME process). Perhaps more importantly, after working on CREAME myself, I NEVER skip a warm up, because we are pressed for time. I my mind now, the warm up is the foundation. If done right, the CR elements should be fantastic growth activities on their own, so if a lesson only gets as far at the CR stage, so be it! They have a wonderful foundation now Very Happy I do think that is more important for their learning than just speeding through the motions to get to the proposed end product of the day.




For Emotions Analysis, this usually includes students assessing their own opinions or their classmates opinions on the topic. 



How is the assessment done?




And for Manipulation, I always try to give my students some element of choice for their projects/papers.



Sounds right -- can you talk a bit about what kind of choice you provide?




As for Expansion, I feel like there might be some overlap here (for me) with Emotions Analysis and Manipulation.  To allow my students to get creative with their work, they often have their own choice of material to research, write/present on, and to expand with. Though, I am not sure I understand this one, as I see a great deal of overlap with the EA and M portions of CREAME.



Ok, I think I see the point of confusion. The Expansion (E) part literally means to go to the next level (be it a full step up or only a quarter step up). So if they are working at level AB2, we want them to collaborate with others and try to approach AB3, or even actually reach AB3. If they are biologically not ready to reach a certain level (most uni students will not reach AB4, for example because they are under 25), there are still many quarter and half steps between each AB level. See Lectica.org for more information on how they split each of Fischer's levels into quarter steps. It's fascinating. 




Techniques that I used to feel would have been condescending, or unnecessary, are now going a long way with helping prime and scaffold my learners to achieve discussions and papers that require higher abstract thinking skills. 



I am very very happy to hear you say this!! Very Happy




It is because I learned, through Fischer's skill theory, that my students are still not fully developed in their prefrontal cortex.  Their ability to understand abstractions, even at only Ab1 or Ab2, is still limited to not only optimal conditions, but also physical conditions.  For this reason, I always try to create optimal conditions, but don't expect my students to 'get it' until they are ready.  Some students catch on to the content in class, for others, they catch on in the next class (after a good rest), and that is ok.  I am not hard on them it... anymore 


Yay! Thanks for sharing insights into your metacognitive journey. Looking forward to reading your next responses!
Robert

View user profile http://fab-efl.com

Sponsored content


Back to top  Message [Page 1 of 1]

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum